I Will Be Speaking At 2015 Success Stories Africa Conference

Ayeni Adekunle

I’m speaking at Success Stories Africa Conference 2015 holding on Saturday 12 September 2015 in Lagos.

 “It gives me joy to share stories and ideas that can possibly make the journey easier for people trying to find their way.”

Aimed at empowering African youths to enable them change their lives for the better, the conference themed ‘Buy The Future’, will also feature addresses from other speakers including Chude JideonwoMonalisa Chinda, Detoun Ogwo and Japheth Omojuwa.

Ayeni Adekunle S

My chat with Project Fame contestants (tips as suggested by my friends on Twitter and Facebook)

Project Fame West Africa

So I spent sometime at the PFWA academy on Tuesday.

My job was to advise contestants on how to manage fame, public relations, and business.

And I shaped the discussion around over 30 tips I received earlier in the day from my followers on Twitter and my friends on Facebook.

You too can join the conversation:

What would you tell 14 young musicians in search of fame and fortune? What do they need to know as they prepare for an industry as unstable and plastic as the music business?!

Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame West Africa MTN Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame West Africa Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame Project Fame Project Fame Facebook Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame Project Fame PFWA Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project Fame West Africa Project Fame Project fame Project Fame Project Fame

Artist PR, Fame and Success Management

Interview: Media Consumers Now Have More Power Than Before – Ayeni

ID Africa

By Funsho Arogundade (The News Nigeria)

 

In this interview with FUNSHO AROGUNDADE, the young media entrepreneur fondly called “Ayeni The Great” gives a rare peek into digital marketing agency ID Africa, his latest business venture, which will see a spread of the BHM Group’s clientele and content across more nations on the African continent

Q: How did BHM Group begin?

A: BHM Group started in 2006, while I was still a reporter, from my two-bedroom flat in Akute (Lagos). My wife and I had no furniture so I bought a small chair and table, and could only afford to pay someone to assemble a computer. We started out working for musicians, actors and record labels that had smaller budgets, so it was tough but fulfilling work.

A few years later, my friend Ayo Animashaun (owner of Hip TV and The Headies) gave me a desk in his office from where BHM operated. Eventually, we had to rent our own office space and today we have 60 employees and various consultants across the world. In 2009 we began working for corporate clients, and they tapped into the experience we had built with entertainers and young people. It has never happened in Nigeria that an organisation with experience solely in entertainment – working for artistes and actors – to begin working for various multinationals. That’s our story and we are proud of it.

Ayeni Adekunle1croped

Q: You recently launched ID Africa, a digital agency and subsidiary of the BHM Group? What do you hope to achieve?

A: With Digital Marketing, disparate uptake rates exist. Brands across regions in Africa are very late to the party, while those trying to get into the party are not in the appropriate attire; I mean they are not using the right tools to speak to, or listen to the people. Africa is a continent of up to 2,000 languages from numerous tribes, with over 1 billion people becoming increasingly globalised, yet retaining the peculiarities that categorise their individual heritages – the status quo is changing. We all know that the latest arrivals to a party can still make the atmosphere electric, so this is an opportunity for practitioners.

We are fortunate to have an extensive understanding, based on our PR background, about people who consume and publish content on the Internet. We know what they are looking for, so we have an understanding of how to use that social space better to create the kind of conversations that can help people meet each other and have a nice time, whether it’s a brand meeting the consumer or just consumers interacting, or even brands needing to engage with each other.

ID Africa is the digital agency that can make this happen because it is not just a service agency; more of Africa’s audiences need to be communicated with and listened to via channels and outlets that best conform to their social, cultural and personal proclivities.

Q: So, what are your experiences as you roll out ID Africa with more continental clients?

A: I cannot divulge research data we have obtained at prohibitive costs, but I will share some insights.

A: To successfully communicate with the diverse audiences and demographics that constitute Africa’s cities and navigate the sociocultural nuances therein, all brands- entertainment or corporate- must treat the term media very loosely. If I can get on a Mutatu in Nairobi or a Danfo in Lagos and speak to 50 passengers, and try to get them to try or understand my new product, then that bus as far as ID Africa is concerned, is as valid a media vehicle as social media is in Johannesburg.

 

Read full interview on thenewsnigeria.com.ng

 

I Started BHM In My Three Bedroom Flat – Ayeni Adekunle

Ayeni Adekunle1 cropped1

By Charles Okogene (Daily Independent Newspaper)

 

Ayeni Adekunle is the PR practitioner, journalist and businessman behind Black House Media (BHM) group, a public relations and digital communications agency based in Lagos, Nigeria, with offices in London, UK. He founded BHM Group in 2006 from humble beginnings that manage strategic communications programmes for companies with interests in entertainment, lifestyle and ICT.

While studying for a degree in microbiology from the University of Ibadan (UI), Ayeni started his career with Hip Hop World magazine, worked with Encomium Weekly, Thisday and The Punch  before leaving to concentrate on the BHM Group. He founded Nigeria Entertainment Today, a niche website on November 23, 2009, five months before launching its print version in April 2010.

Since 2013, Ayeni has convened the annual Nigerian Entertainment Conference, the largest gathering of artistes and professionals in Nigerian entertainment, and in 2014, he led the BHM Group to conceptualise and build BHM App, Nigeria’s first PR mobile application.

BHM’s clients include MTV Base, Nigerian Breweries, Nickelodeon, Hennessy, Interswitch, Verve, as well as BET and Comedy Central.

In this interview with journalists, he gives a rare peek into digital marketing agency ID Africa, his latest business venture, which will see a spread of the BHM Group’s clientele and content across more nations on the African continent.

How did BHM Group begin?

BHM Group started in 2006, while I was still a reporter, from my two-bedroom flat in Akute (Lagos). My wife and I had no furniture so I bought a small chair and table, and could only afford to pay someone to assemble a computer. We started out working for musicians, actors and record labels that had smaller budgets, so it was tough but fulfilling work.

A few years later, my friend Ayo Animashaun gave me a desk in his office from where BHM operated. Eventually, we had to rent our own office space and today we have 60 employees and various consultants across the world. In 2009 we began working for corporates, and they tapped into the experience we had built with entertainers and young people.

It’s never happened in Nigeria that an organisation comes from entertainment  – working for artistes and actors – to begin working for multinationals. That’s our story and we are proud of it.

ID Africa

You’ve recently launched ID Africa, a digital agency and subsidiary of the BHM Group? What do you hope to achieve?

With Digital Marketing, disparate uptake rates exist.  Brands across regions in Africa are very late to the party, while those trying to get into the party are not in the appropriate attire; I mean they are not using the right tools to speak to, or listen to the people. Africa is a continent of up to 2000 languages from numerous tribes, with over 1 billion people becoming increasingly globalised, yet retaining the peculiarities that categorize their individual heritages – the status quo is changing. We all know that the latest arrivals to a party can still make the atmosphere electric, so this is an opportunity for practitioners.

We are fortunate to have an extensive understanding, based on our PR background, about people who consume and publish content on the Internet. We know what they are looking for, so we have an understanding of how to use that social space better to create the kind of conversations that can help people meet each other and have a nice time, whether it’s a brand meeting the consumer or just consumers interacting, or even brands needing to engage with each other.

 

Read full interview on dailyindependentnig.com

 

Digital PR to the Rescue

id3

By Raheem Akingbolu (ThisDay Newspaper)

 

Like other aspects of marketing communications, the goal post for effective public relations practice has been shifted from traditional to a blend of traditional and digital. A survey of the industry shows that most companies now rely more on agencies with the understanding of the new trend for their briefs than those with only traditional experience. This, according to a source, informed why most of the PR businesses won in recent time were as a result of the winners’ depth in digital application.

The Chief Executive Officer of Black House Media (BHM), Mr. Ayeni Adekunle, whose agency is currently making waves in this regard told THISDAY during the week that the best way any agency can survive in today’s market is to be dynamic in skill acquisition and understanding of the global trend.

Ayeni Adekunle

Sharing insights on how BHM has been able to weather the storm, despite the global technological advancement which has redefined the PR space, Ayeni said his agency’s staying power lies in the ability to read between the lines as trend changes.

“With PR, our approach has always been to understand how the media landscape has changed, is changing, and therefore ascertain what tools we need to use to deliver value to brands and audiences alike. Before, the media was a brick wall you had to pass through, to get to the consumer. Today, every consumer, every brand, is a publisher and recipient of content. Just as there are billboards on the roads, there are digital billboards to draw in and engage the consumer, but their construction for Africa-focused demographics is a whole different field which we are excited to have the privilege of labouring in.

So ID Africa is here to further the premise on which the BHM Group itself is built – ensuring that as manufacturers and consumers, we do not lose sight of the ‘social” in social media, and the “media” in media communication.

With PR, our approach has always been to understand how the media landscape has changed, is changing, and therefore ascertain what tools we need to use to deliver value to brands and audiences alike. Before, the media was a brick wall you had to pass through, to get to the consumer. Today, every consumer, every brand, is a publisher and recipient of content. Just as there are billboards on the roads, there are digital billboards to draw in and engage the consumer, but their construction for Africa-focused demographics is a whole different field which we are excited to have the privilege of labouring in.

Enters ID Africa

The practitioner also spoke about the recently launched ID Africa, a digital agency and subsidiary of the BHM Group, which he said was established to further deepening the practice.

“With Digital Marketing, disparate uptake rates exist.  Brands across regions in Africa are very late to the party, while those trying to get into the party are not in the appropriate attire; I mean they are not using the right tools to speak to, or listen to the people. Africa is a continent of up to 2000 languages from numerous tribes, with over 1 billion people becoming increasingly globalised, yet retaining the peculiarities that categorise their individual heritages – the status quo is changing. We all know that the latest arrivals to a party can still make the atmosphere electric, so this is an opportunity for practitioners.

 

Read full interview on thisdaylive.com

African Businesses are late to Digital marketing, says Ayeni

id2

By Goddie Ofose (The Niche Newspaper)

 

Genesis of BHM Group

BHM Group started in 2006 from my two-bedroom flat in Akute, Lagos while I was a reporter. My wife and I had no furniture so I bought a small chair and table, and could only afford to pay someone to assemble a computer.

We started out working for musicians, actors, and record labels that had small budgets. It was a tough but fulfilling work.

A few years later, my friend, Ayo Animashaun, gave me a desk in his office from where BHM operated. Eventually, we rented our own office space and today we have 60 employees and consultants across the world.

In 2009, we began working for corporates, and they tapped into the experience we had built with entertainers and young people.

It had never happened in Nigeria that an organisation comes from entertainment – working for artistes and actors – to work for multinationals.

That’s our story and we are proud of it.

Exploring digital marketing

With digital marketing, disparate uptake rates exist. Brands across regions in Africa are very late to the party, while those trying to get in are not in the appropriate attire; I mean they are not using the right tools to speak to or listen to the people.

Africa is a continent of up to 2,000 languages from numerous tribes – with over one billion people becoming increasingly globalised, yet retaining the peculiarities that categorise their individual heritages. The status quo is changing.

The latest arrivals to a party can still make the atmosphere electric, so this is an opportunity for practitioners.

We are fortunate to have an extensive understanding, based on our PR background, about people who consume and publish content on the internet.

We know what they are looking for, so we have an understanding of how to use that social space better to create the kind of conversations that can help people meet each other and have a nice time, whether it’s a brand meeting the consumer or just consumers interacting, or even brands needing to engage with one another.

ID Africa is the digital agency that can make this happen because it is not just a service agency; more of Africa’s audiences need to be communicated with and listened to via channels and outlets that best conform to their social, cultural, and personal proclivities.

Ayeni Adekunle1croped

Observing the space

I cannot divulge research data we obtained at prohibitive costs, but I will share some insights.

To successfully communicate with the diverse audiences and demographics that constitute Africa’s cities and navigate the sociocultural nuances therein, all brands – entertainment or corporate – must treat the term ‘media’ very loosely.

 

Read full interview on thenicheng.com

 

ID Africa: Uniting Continent With Digital Support

id1

By Afolabi Idowu (The Union Newspaper)

 

The increased Internet penetration and the resultant increase in the publishing and consumption of content online are the factors that conspired to necessitate the emergence of ID Africa. The Group Managing Director of BHM Group, Mr. Adekunle Ayeni told the UNION recently According to him, “We will not be seeking to merely replicate successful campaigns in one country, or go to another country and toe the line, no.

Africa is not a country, but a cohort of nations with diverse social, cultural and political influences and nuances. Therefore, ID Africa will be taking into consideration how each of these factors will make or mar each brief, each brand and each consumer demographic we are trying to tackle,” “For example, a brief might mean ID Africa looks at target cities, even for the making an online campaign that would run solely on the Internet.

We would do this because we know that mobile phones have killed off most cyber cafés in many Nigerian cities, so we expect the Nigerian consumer to most likely be consuming content from one of the over 83 million active phone lines Nigeria has. Studies show many young people in Ghana and South Africa still use Internet cafes, even though they have a mobile phone.”

Ayeni Adekunle2

He added, “In Cape Town in particular, there’s evidence that mobile phones and public access computers are not substitutes for one another. Juxtapose this with Senegal, where Google   opened what it called Africa’s first cybercafé that works only with tablets in 2013 and you will see why ID Africa is excited to explore the digital opportunities that abound for consumers and brands alike.”

His company, The BHM Group now has a London office, morphing into a chain of businesses that manages strategic communications programs for companies with interests in financial services, entertainment, lifestyle and fashion, media, consumer goods, marketing and technology. Its clientele is just as varied, with brands like First Bank Nigeria, Verve, Hennessy, Nigerian Breweries and Interswitch, as well as Viacom, parent company of MTV Base, Nickelodeon, BET and Comedy Central. Speaking further, “Rising Internet penetration in Nigeria and across Africa has increasingly pushed content publishers and consumers to interact online.This shift has created the necessary conditions for the emergence of ID Africa.”

 

Read full interview on theunion.com.ng